untamedgorilla
kltart:


Ladies 1st Collection: A Tribute to the Women of Hip-Hop
I was inspired to make this piece of artwork because I noticed that females always get the short end of the stick when it comes to discussing hip-hop. When learning about the history of hip-hop, the female contribution is rarely mentioned and in today’s era, there are barely any female emcees carrying their own as they did in the 80’s and 90’s. I made this piece to show my appreciation for the culture of hip-hop and to pay homage to the women who have paved the way and made their mark in Black music.


how many do YOU reccognize?…..

kltart:

Ladies 1st Collection: A Tribute to the Women of Hip-Hop

I was inspired to make this piece of artwork because I noticed that females always get the short end of the stick when it comes to discussing hip-hop. When learning about the history of hip-hop, the female contribution is rarely mentioned and in today’s era, there are barely any female emcees carrying their own as they did in the 80’s and 90’s. I made this piece to show my appreciation for the culture of hip-hop and to pay homage to the women who have paved the way and made their mark in Black music.

how many do YOU reccognize?…..

The sci-fi genre has not always been such a welcoming place for women. In the original Trek, most of the women were in miniskirts or tin-foil bikinis. Even Uhura wasn’t much of a role …She was eye candy. But that’s true of every genre. Eighty percent of what’s out there is told through the point of view of a male. I can sit down with so many filmmakers for so many projects and play so many actors’ girlfriends or wives. But in sci-fi, I can play Gamora.
— Zoe Saldana, interview with The Hollywood Reporter

The sci-fi genre has not always been such a welcoming place for women. In the original Trek, most of the women were in miniskirts or tin-foil bikinis. Even Uhura wasn’t much of a role …

She was eye candy. But that’s true of every genre. Eighty percent of what’s out there is told through the point of view of a male. I can sit down with so many filmmakers for so many projects and play so many actors’ girlfriends or wives. But in sci-fi, I can play Gamora.

— Zoe Saldana, interview with The Hollywood Reporter

Like the Nina Simone biopic coming out later this year. You’ve been blue and you’ve been green, but ironically the movie that generated the most controversy is the one in which you’re brown. There was criticism that you were too light-skinned to play Simone.You have to try to understand where people are coming from. This has always been an issue in our society. A white person can play Cleopatra, even though Cleopatra was a North African woman who in reality had coffee skin. But that’s not sellable in Hollywood. So you get Elizabeth Taylor with purple eyes. So there’s always been a lot of tension in the African-American community about Hollywood being a whitewashing machine. But that wasn’t the case with Nina. There were so many other variables that people don’t know about. I wasn’t the first person to step up to the plate. They went out to everybody for the part. There were other people attached for years [like Mary J. Blige]. And they just decided not to do it. And at the end of the day, we had to tell this story. It’s our duty to go out and tell stories about women and about people of color because we don’t do that enough.
— Zoe Saldana, interview with The Hollywood Reporter

Like the Nina Simone biopic coming out later this year. You’ve been blue and you’ve been green, but ironically the movie that generated the most controversy is the one in which you’re brown. There was criticism that you were too light-skinned to play Simone.

You have to try to understand where people are coming from. This has always been an issue in our society. A white person can play Cleopatra, even though Cleopatra was a North African woman who in reality had coffee skin. But that’s not sellable in Hollywood. So you get Elizabeth Taylor with purple eyes. So there’s always been a lot of tension in the African-American community about Hollywood being a whitewashing machine. But that wasn’t the case with Nina. There were so many other variables that people don’t know about. I wasn’t the first person to step up to the plate. They went out to everybody for the part. There were other people attached for years [like Mary J. Blige]. And they just decided not to do it. And at the end of the day, we had to tell this story. It’s our duty to go out and tell stories about women and about people of color because we don’t do that enough.

— Zoe Saldana, interview with The Hollywood Reporter

studslayer

MOCW & the Suppression of Their Sexuality

studslayer:

There’s been a trend on ‘Black Lesbian Twitter and Facebook’ of ppl shaming, bullying, making fun of and mocking masculine of center women (studs, AG’s, doms, butches) who pose naked or in a sexual/seductive manner. I’m the subject of it quite frequently due to my pics being leaked everywhere except the site I originally posted them on (tumblr) but of course I knew that would happen and besides I have thick skin (FUCK EM, I’m grown). But for those who innocently and proudly want to showcase the pride they have in their body and sexuality, often find themselves in the middle of a storm. As far as I can tell the shaming comes equally from both other MOCW and femmes. I won’t even talk about the body shaming and the hefty side of colorism that comes along with the slut shaming. Of course if the stud is light skinned and super skinny and covered in tats she gets a pass. Anyone else who doesn’t fit that profile is relentlessly badgered with no escape. But for now I’ll only discuss the shaming and suppression of masculine women’s sexuality.

I see hundreds of images of femmes posing in bathroom mirrors showcasing their assets and bragging about who’s the ‘baddest bitch’. These pics are reblogged and retweeted with enthusiasm and thirst at the speed of lightening. Femmes and studs alike enjoy and share these pics until…there’s one of a stud and then the heckling starts. Why the double standard?

In my humble opinion when femmes mock studs for expressing their sexuality it is out of fear and sometimes jealously, especially if the femme that is doing the mocking feels that the stud is better looking or appealing. With the heightened awareness of stud for stud (s4s) some femmes feel they’re competing for the attention of studs not just from other femmes, but also from bois like me who date studs. Making studs feel ashamed for being a woman is a manipulative way of controlling them. It circles back to age old ‘studs shouldn’t do this or that’ rules, that our community has adopted in order to enforce and perpetuate gender roles.

Studs mock and bully other studs because they are insecure and threatened by the womanhood of another stud. Why? Because they haven’t yet embraced their own. They’ve been conditioned to think that acting like a woman or embracing feminine traits somehow demeans their masculinity and threatens their power. Sounds familiar huh (coughs…patriarchy)? Studs join the bandwagon of bullying their peers so they may not be perceived as weak or anything less than the boi they scream they are. If the world sees one stud acting feminine then goddamn we ALL must be punks huh? Again this mentality is rooted in insecurity and the highly charged pressure to conform, enforce gender roles, and NOT deviate from the majority.

In 2013 although most everyone is claiming to love and embrace sex, I see countless dialogue and actions that shame ppl for engaging in it. When gospel singer Kevin Terry was outed as gay because a former lover leaked a video of him giving oral ‘Black twitter’ both gay and straight condemned and vilified him even though I’m sure the ones doing so has either received or given head at some time. Here is a MAN, a seemingly and much perceived straight, dark, black man engaging in an act that’s stigmatized as being ‘bitch made’ because he’s on his knees sucking dick (he’s doing it very well I might add). Because of this one act he’s no longer a ‘man’. Sound familiar (black lesbian community?) 

 But back to the topic at hand…why studs showing tits and ass is taboo in our community is beyond rational thinking to ME, but clearly I’m in the minority. I’ve known plenty of studs who refuse to get completely naked during sex because they’ve been shamed into not only hating their bodies but ignoring their sexual needs as well (I’ve written a blog discussing that). I’ve talked to studs whose femme girlfriends tried to make them feel bad for having better bodies/curves than them. “You’re a stud, you’re not supposed to be shaped that way!” WHAT THE ENTIRE FUCK? And sadly these studs carry guilt and oppression all throughout their relationships because they don’t want their masculinity ever being called into question.

Masculinity is perceived as power and femininity is perceived as weakness, so therefore a stud who embraces, shows off, and is proud of her WOMANHOOD is weak. I think the exact opposite. I think it’s powerful and courageous to embrace your body (HOWEVER IT MAY LOOK) and sexuality (WHATEVER THAT MAY BE). In a world where it is discouraged to be and love yourself it is quite liberating and brave to expose yourself or your sexiness, especially for public viewing. There’s nothing ‘punk ass’ about exposing your sexuality or body under the microscope of scrutiny and judgment and STILL being able to walk proudly and hold your head high.

Again I tell my MOCW, ONLY when you stand up for yourself and your peers will you be free from the imaginary chains that bind your body, spirit and sexuality. Stop being a follower for likes and retweets and be a friend and ally because it’s the right and moral thing to do. You don’t have to always follow the crowd. I can tell you from experience the view is better from the front leading.

SS